Filter
Drink:
Topics:
Terms:
B&B Bacchus Baco Noir Bacterial Baden Baking Balance Balling Bamboo Bananas Banyuls Barbaresco Barbaresco DOCG Barbera Barbera d'Alba Barbera d'Asti Barbera d'Asti DOCG Barbera del Monferrato Barbera del Piemonte Bardolino DOC Barley Barley Malt Extract Barley Malt Syrup Barolo Barolo "Serralunga d'Alba" Barolo DOCG Barossa Valley Barrel Fermenting Barrel Proof Barreling Down Barrique Barsac Basilicata Batf Batida de Coco Baume Bavaria Baybreeze Bead Beaujolais Beaujolais Blanc Beaujolais-Villages Beaumes de Venise Blanc Beaumes de Venise Rouge Beaune Beaune "Boucherettes" Beaune "Champs Pimont" Beaune "Clos de la Feguine" Beaune "Clos de la Mousse" Beaune "Clos des Mouches" Beaune "Clos des Ursules" Beaune "Greves" Beaune “Cent-Vignes” Beaune 1er Cru Beaune Rouge Bee’s Knees Beechwood Chips Beerenauslese Belgium Bell Mountain Bellini Ben Lomond Mountain Bench Graft Bentonite Bergerac Berries Berry Beta Amylase Biblical Wine References Big Bijou Binning Biological Aging Biscuit Malt Bitter Bitterness Units Bjcp Black Currant Black Rot Black Russian Blanc de Blancs Blanc de Noirs Blaufrankisch Blaye Côtes de Bordeaux Blending Blood & Sand Bloody Maria Bloody Mary Bloom Blue Blazer Blue Fining Boadicea Bobby Burns Body Bolgheri Bonarda Bonded Cellar Bonnezeaux Bordeaux Bordeaux AOC Bordeaux Blanc Bordeaux Rosé Bordeaux Rouge Bordeaux Supèrieur Botrytis Cinerea Bottle Sickness Bottle Stink Bottle-Conditioned Bottled In Bond Bottom Fermentation Boulevardier Bouquet Bourgogne Blanc Bourgogne Rouge Brachetto d'Acqui Brachetto d'Acqui DOCG Brachetto Piemonte Braggot Bramble Brandy Brandy Alexander Brandy Crusta Bravo Breakfast Martini Breathing Brettanomyces Brilliant British Columbia Brix Bromophenol Bronx Brooklyn Brouilly Brown Derby Brunello di Montalcino Brut BTG Buck Buck's Fizz Bud Bud Break Buik Bulk Bunch Bung Bung Stave Bunghole Burgenland Burgundy Butt Butter Butyric Byob
Drinkipedia
Bentonite
Bentonite is a clay which, in very pure form, is used to fine wines, especially white wines for the purpose of correcting heat instability. When stirred into a wine, the bentonite absorbs excessive yeast protein from the wine and holds it tightly. Under some conditions, this protein could later cause a cloud, haze or sediment to form in the wine if not removed. After allowing the bentonite to contact the wine, it is racked or filtered off, taking the protein with it and ridding the wine of the future problem. The wine is said to have been "bentonite fined." (Wine,Beer,Spirits,Sake,Mead/Production)