Full Review

Philip Mead

Philip Mead
Traditional Sweet Mead

Pair this wine with:
Cheese Chicken

Category: Traditional Mead

Date Tasted:
Country: Brazil
Alcohol: 14% RS: 4.9%
92 Points
Gold Medal
Exceptional
$16
Best Buy

Philip Mead
Traditional Sweet Mead

Pair this wine with:
Cheese Chicken

Category: Traditional Mead

Date Tasted:
Country: Brazil
Alcohol: 14% RS: 4.9%
Light gold color. Aromas and flavors of orange, mint, and lavender, eucalyptus oil, yellow apple, and red grapefruit with a round, lively, dryish medium body and a complex, medium-length finish revealing notes of orange and red grapefruit, basswood honey, mint, and field of wild clover. Unabashedly and wholeheartedly honey in its true self from start to finish.

Tasting Info

Wine Glass Style: Spicy & Complex
Aroma Aroma: orange, mint, and lavender, eucalyptus oil, yellow apple, and red grapefruit
Taste Flavor: Same as aromas with notes of orange and red grapefruit, basswood honey, mint, and field of wild clover
Sweetness Sweetness: Dryish
Enjoy Enjoy: with food and on its own
Recipes Pairing: Chicken Tagine, Chicken Kebobs, Chevre
Bottom Line Bottom Line: Unabashedly and wholeheartedly honey in its true self from start to finish.

The Producer

Philip Mead

The Producer

Their Portfolio

92 Philip Mead Traditional Sweet Mead 14% (Brazil) $16.00.
92 Philip Mead Oak Aged Sweet Mead 14% (Brazil) $16.00.
88 Philip Mead Red Fruits Mead 14% (Brazil) $16.00.
85 Philip Mead Double Oak Dry Mead 15% (Brazil) $16.00.
92 Philip Mead Traditional Sweet Mead 14% (Brazil) $16.00.
90 Philip Mead Oak Aged Sweet Mead 14% (Brazil) $16.00.
90 Philip Mead Red Fruits Mead 14% (Brazil) $16.00.
88 Philip Mead Double Oak Dry Mead 15% (Brazil) $16.00.
93 Philip Mead Fresh Pineapple Mead 14% (Brazil) $16.00.
91 Philip Mead Fresh Lemon Mead 14% (Brazil) $16.00.
92 Philip Mead Dark Cacao Mead 14% (Brazil) $16.00.

Traditional Mead

Traditional meads should incorporate only honey as a fermentable ingredient, along with water and of course yeast. They can range in character from dry to semi-sweet to sweet, and may be sparkling or still. While not necessarily “traditional”, they may also be fortified and/or barrel-aged. Whether the honey used is a single varietal or a mixture, it is important for a successful traditional mead to evidence the floral nature of the honey; indeed, it should be the defining characteristic. Some acidity is often desired to balance sweetness, but this is not necessary. Lighter versions may be analogous to white wines of corresponding sweetness/dryness, but should present distinctly honeyed emphasis.