Full Review

Marquis de Montesquiou

Marquis de Montesquiou
Reserve Armagnac

Category: VSOP Armagnac

Date Tasted:
Country: France
Alcohol: 43%
88 Points
Silver Medal
Highly Recommended
$39.99

Marquis de Montesquiou
Reserve Armagnac

Category: VSOP Armagnac

Date Tasted:
Country: France
Alcohol: 43%
Golden amber color. Aromas of dates in caramel, candied nuts, toasted challah, and banana puree with a velvety, crisp, dry-yet-fruity light-to-medium body and a warming, amusing, medium-length raisin, cardamom, black pepper, and custard finish. A nicely rounded Armagnac that makes for a toasty cool-weather nightcap.

Tasting Info

Spirits Glass Style: Rich & Candied
Aroma Aroma: dates in caramel, candied nuts, toasted challah, and banana puree
Taste Flavor: raisin, cardamom, black pepper, and custard
Smoothness Smoothness: Warming
Enjoy Enjoy: in cocktails, neat and on the rocks
Cocktail Cocktails: Vieux Carré, Brandy Crusta, Champs-Élysées
Bottom Line Bottom Line: A nicely rounded Armagnac that makes for a toasty cool-weather nightcap.

The Producer

Spirits Partners

The Producer
112 Avenue Kleber
Paris, 75116
France
33 -0153234203

Their Portfolio

VSOP Armagnac

Spirits Glass Snifter Brandy.jpg
Serve in a Snifter
Armagnac is the oldest type of Brandy in France, with documented references to distillation dating back to the early 15th century. The Armagnac region is located in the heart of the ancient province of Gascony in the southwest corner of France. As in Cognac, there are regional growing zones: Bas-Armagnac, Haut Armagnac, and Tenareze. The primary grapes used in making Armagnac are likewise the Ugni Blanc, Folle Blanche, and Colombard. But distillation takes place in the unique alambic Armagnacais, a type of column still that is even more "inefficient" than a typical Cognac pot still.

The resulting brandy has a rustic, assertive character and aroma that requires additional cask aging to mellow it out. The best Armagnacs are aged in casks made from the local Monlezun oak. In recent years Limousin and Troncais oak casks have been added to the mix of casks as suitable Monlezun oak becomes harder to find.

Most Armagnacs are blends, but unlike Cognac, single vintages and single vineyard bottlings can be found. The categories of Armagnac are generally the same as those of Cognac (V.S., V.S.O.P., X.O., etc.). Blended Armagnacs frequently have a greater percentage of older vintages in their mix than comparable Cognacs, making them a better value for the discerning buyer.