Full Review

Les Parcelles de Stéphane Derenoncourt

Les Parcelles de Stéphane Derenoncourt
2014 Margaux

Pair this wine with:
Beef Vegetables

Category: Bordeaux Margaux

Date Tasted:
Country: France
Alcohol: 14% RS: <1%
94 Points
Gold Medal
Exceptional
$95
Cellar Selection

Les Parcelles de Stéphane Derenoncourt
2014 Margaux

Pair this wine with:
Beef Vegetables

Category: Bordeaux Margaux

Date Tasted:
Country: France
Alcohol: 14% RS: <1%
Opaque deep purple color. Mature aromas and flavors of grilled plums, ancho chile, cinnamon-sugar tart, raw mushrooms,leather, and carnation with a lightly tannic, vibrant, dry full body and a medium-length finish with notes of wet grass with earthy, grippy tannins and moderate oak flavor. A serious wine that will blossom with time.

Tasting Info

Wine Glass Style: Rich & Full & Oaky
Aroma Aroma: grilled plums, ancho chile, cinnamon-sugar tart, raw mushrooms,leather, and carnation
Taste Flavor: Same as aromas with notes of wet grass
Sweetness Sweetness: Dry
Enjoy Enjoy: In 6+ years with food and on its own
Recipes Pairing: Grilled Sirloin, Steak & Potatoes, Beef Stew
Bottom Line Bottom Line: A serious wine that will blossom with time.

The Producer

Maison Bouey

The Producer
1 Rue de la Commanderie des Templiers
Ambares, Bordeaux 33440
France

Bordeaux Margaux

Wine Glass Cabernet.jpg
Serve in a Cabernet Wine Glass
As the Gironde river flows out to the sea past the city of Bordeaux, it meets another river, the Dordogne, and forms a tidal estuary known as the Garonne. The strip of land between the estuary and the Atlantic is known as the Medoc. It's not much to look at, but certain parts of it, given the right weather conditions, can produce some of the world's greatest wines. Within the Medoc, the most glamorous appellations include Margaux, St. Julien, Pauillac, and St. Estephe. Though there are minor differences between them, they can be broadly generalized as producing firm, intense, flavorful reds, among them some of the world's premier expressions of cabernet sauvignon.
In recent times, the producers on this list have experienced greater and greater demand. The world has decided it wants Bordeaux, and there's only so much to go around. This is an equation for spiraling prices, and the Bordelais have been more than happy to accommodate--particularly with successful vintages. To get the very best of the Medoc, you will have to pay more dearly for it than ever. The savvy consumer would be wise to look for the better vintages as they arrive in stores, and determine which producers, particularly in the second or third tier, seem to offer a modicum of value. With this approach, Bordeaux need not be as painfully expensive as it otherwise might.

Best Buys for
Bordeaux Margaux