Full Review

Champagne Devaux

Champagne Devaux
NV Grande Reserve, Champagne

Pair this wine with:
Chicken Pork

Category: Champagne Brut NV

Date Tasted:
Country: France
Alcohol: 12% RS: <1%
94 Points
Gold Medal
Exceptional
$43
Cellar Selection

Champagne Devaux
NV Grande Reserve, Champagne

Pair this wine with:
Chicken Pork

Category: Champagne Brut NV

Date Tasted:
Country: France
Alcohol: 12% RS: <1%
Light gold color. Aromas of french canelé pastry, brioche with apricot preserve, gunsmoke, and butter-poached apple with a round, racy, finely carbonated, dryish medium body and a tingling, distinctive, long yuzu marmalade, salted parker dinner rolls, and dried pineapple finish. A NV champagne that will stand the test of time; smoky, svelte, and stimulating.

Tasting Info

Wine Glass Style: Crisp & Lively
Aroma Aroma: French canelé pastry, brioche with apricot preserve, gunsmoke, and butter-poached apple
Taste Flavor: yuzu marmalade, salted parker dinner rolls, and dried pineapple
Sweetness Sweetness: Dryish
Enjoy Enjoy: Now-6 years on its own and with food
Recipes Pairing: Fruit Stuffed Roasted Pork, Chicken Kebobs, Cobb Salad
Bottom Line Bottom Line: A NV champagne that will stand the test of time; smoky, svelte, and stimulating.

The Importer

Seaview Imports

The Importer
48 Harbour Park, Suite D
Port Washington, NY 11050
USA

Champagne Brut NV

Wine Glass Champagne.jpg
Serve in a Champagne Flute
Non-Vintage Brut is the most important category of Champagne. The vast bulk of Champagne is Non-Vintage and the healthy sales of this category are what keeps the Euros flowing in the region. A typical Non-Vintage cuvée will be composed of wine from two of the most recent vintages blended together, with a very small amount of older vintages. The demanding task of a champagne blender is to keep a typical house style by blending many different batches of wine. Quality does vary, at least from year to year if not batch to batch. A succession of good vintages will result in great Non-Vintage champagne with inverse consequences for a run of lesser years.

At the bottling stage Champagne is nearly always sweetened by the addition of a small sweetened dose of wine, called the dosage. The vast bulk of Champagne (including all Vintage releases) is of the "Brut" level of dryness: Dry to the palate though very lightly sweetened. The exact level of dryness of a brut style will vary from producer to producer, but is generally between 0 and 1.2% residual sugar.