Sake Crash Course

Sharpen up your sake skills with the help of Tastings.com. We’ll teach you how to decode sake lingo, choose the sake that’s right for you, and even give you serving tips. Use Tastings.com to discover the world of Japanese Sake.
Junmai: Pure and Polished

Junmai: Pure and Polished

Photo Credit: Tastings.com
The word Junmai on a bottle of sake indicates that it is made from only rice, water, yeast, and koji mold. 30% of the outer hull of each grain of rice must be removed through polishing. These are pure sakes, typically full bodied, that are dry to off-dry. Serve an award-winning Junmai Sake from Okunomatsu using a traditional 'shaku' pour— pour two-handed and always serve others first— never yourself.

Ginjo: Creative Expression

Ginjo: Creative Expression

Photo Credit: Tastings.com
Junmai ginjo is a Junmai sake that has had more of the outer hull of the rice grains polished away— 40% or more! This leads to more expressive aromas of fruit or floral notes and a softer finish. We love Hakutsuru Superior Junmai Ginjo for its exceptional quality and value. Try it with smoked salmon or peach-glazed chicken.

Honjozo Daiginjo: Painstaking Perfection

Honjozo Daiginjo: Painstaking Perfection

Photo Credit: Tastings.com
Honjozo style sake is just like junmai in that it must have 30% of the rice grain's husks polished away and they much be made with only rice, water, yeast and Koji mold. The key difference between Junmai and Honjozo is that Honjozo is made with a small amount of brewer's alcohol added during or after fermentation. This style sake is best for those seeking a dry, lighter body and a fragrant nose. Murai Family Daiginjo Sake is a honjozo made from rice that has been painstakingly polished to just 50% of its volume making it exceptionally expressive and ethereal. This is the perfect sushi Sake!

Junmai: Pure and Polished
Ginjo: Creative Expression
Honjozo Daiginjo: Painstaking Perfection
Sake Crash Course
Sharpen up your sake skills with the help of Tastings.com. We’ll teach you how to decode sake lingo, choose the sake that’s right for you, and even give you serving tips. Use Tastings.com to discover the world of Japanese Sake.

Junmai: Pure and Polished

Junmai: Pure and Polished
Photo Credit: Tastings.com
The word Junmai on a bottle of sake indicates that it is made from only rice, water, yeast, and koji mold. 30% of the outer hull of each grain of rice must be removed through polishing. These are pure sakes, typically full bodied, that are dry to off-dry. Serve an award-winning Junmai Sake from Okunomatsu using a traditional 'shaku' pour— pour two-handed and always serve others first— never yourself.

Ginjo: Creative Expression

Ginjo: Creative Expression
Photo Credit: Tastings.com
Junmai ginjo is a Junmai sake that has had more of the outer hull of the rice grains polished away— 40% or more! This leads to more expressive aromas of fruit or floral notes and a softer finish. We love Hakutsuru Superior Junmai Ginjo for its exceptional quality and value. Try it with smoked salmon or peach-glazed chicken.

Honjozo Daiginjo: Painstaking Perfection

Honjozo Daiginjo: Painstaking Perfection
Photo Credit: Tastings.com
Honjozo style sake is just like junmai in that it must have 30% of the rice grain's husks polished away and they much be made with only rice, water, yeast and Koji mold. The key difference between Junmai and Honjozo is that Honjozo is made with a small amount of brewer's alcohol added during or after fermentation. This style sake is best for those seeking a dry, lighter body and a fragrant nose. Murai Family Daiginjo Sake is a honjozo made from rice that has been painstakingly polished to just 50% of its volume making it exceptionally expressive and ethereal. This is the perfect sushi Sake!