Full Review

Joto

Joto
Junmai Nigori Sake

Pair this wine with:
Cheese Fish Shellfish Vegetables

Category: Nigori Sake

Date Tasted:
Country: Japan
Alcohol: 15%
94 Points
Gold Medal
Exceptional
$22.99

Joto
Junmai Nigori Sake

Pair this wine with:
Cheese Fish Shellfish Vegetables

Category: Nigori Sake

Date Tasted:
Country: Japan
Alcohol: 15%
Opaque straw color. Aromas of bavarian cream, caramel drizzled pineapple, and strawberry kefir with a creamy, crisp, fruity sweet light-to-medium body and a seamless, breezy cheese cake, whipped creme, and vanilla finish. A creamy and dreamy Nigori that’s pure and expressive.

Tasting Info

Wine Glass Style: Fruity & Juicy & Smooth
Aroma Aroma: bavarian cream, caramel drizzled pineapple, and strawberry kefir
Taste Flavor: cheese cake, whipped creme, and vanilla
Sweetness Sweetness: Fruity Sweet
Enjoy Enjoy: Now on its own and with food
Recipes Pairing: Sushi, Tempura, Swiss
Bottom Line Bottom Line: A creamy and dreamy Nigori that's pure and expressive.

The Producer or Importer or Other

Kobrand Corporation

The Producer or  Importer or  Other
1 Manhattanville Road 4th Floor
Purchase, NY 10577
USA
1 914-253-7700

Their Portfolio

88 Eiko Fuji Ban Ryu Honjonzo Sake 15.3% (Japan) $18.99.
87 Eiko Fuji Ban Ryu Honjonzo Sake 15.3% (Japan) $19.99.
87 Joto Junmai Sake 15% (Japan) $22.99.
94 Joto Junmai Ginjo Sake 16% (Japan) $26.99.
85 Joto Daiginjo Sake 16% (Japan) $42.99.
85 Joto Junmai Nigori Sake 15% (Japan) $22.99.
87 Joto Junmai Sake 15% (Japan) $42.99.
84 Joto Daiginjo Sake 16% (Japan) $49.99.
93 Joto Junmai Ginjo Sake 15% (Japan) $22.99.
94 Joto Junmai Nigori Sake 15% (Japan) $22.99.
86 Maboroshi Junmai Gingo Sake 15% (Japan) $33.99.
84 Maboroshi Junmai Gingo Sake 15% (Japan) $34.99.
84 Shichi Hon Junmai Sake 16% (Japan) $28.99.
85 Shichi Hon Junmai Sake 15% (Japan) $32.99.
92 Yuki No Bosha Junmai Gingo Sake 16% (Japan) $31.99.
92 Yuki No Bosha Junmai Gingo Sake 16% (Japan) $31.99.

Nigori Sake

Wine Glass Sake.jpg
Serve in a Stemless Wine Glass
Nigori saké is unfiltered, appearing cloudy, and is the way saké has been brewed in Japan for much of its 2000 year history. It’s sweeter than most sakés, and many people enjoy its nut-like quality. It pairs well with more spicy/savory foods and works best with non-Japanese Asian cuisines such as Thai and Korean or seafood prepared with a fruit sauce.