Full Review

Eiko Fuji

Eiko Fuji
Ban Ryu Honjonzo Sake

Pair this wine with:
Cheese Fish Shellfish Vegetables

Category: Honjozo Sake

Date Tasted:
Country: Japan
Alcohol: 15.3%
87 Points
Silver Medal
Highly Recommended
$19.99

Eiko Fuji
Ban Ryu Honjonzo Sake

Pair this wine with:
Cheese Fish Shellfish Vegetables

Category: Honjozo Sake

Date Tasted:
Country: Japan
Alcohol: 15.3%
Pale straw color. Aromas and flavors of butter cookies, beeswax candle, and wildflowers with a satiny, bright, fruity light-to-medium body and a polished, carefree finish with notes of thyme and hint of lychee finish. A smooth and amicable Honjozo that will hit the spot.

Tasting Info

Wine Glass Style: Fruity & Juicy & Smooth
Aroma Aroma: butter cookies, beeswax candle, and wildflowers
Taste Flavor: Same as aromas with notes of thyme and hint of lychee
Sweetness Sweetness: Fruity
Enjoy Enjoy: Now on its own and with food
Recipes Pairing: Sushi, Tempura, Swiss
Bottom Line Bottom Line: A smooth and amicable Honjozo that will hit the spot.

The Producer or Importer or Other

Kobrand Corporation

The Producer or  Importer or  Other
1 Manhattanville Road 4th Floor
Purchase, NY 10577
USA
1 914-253-7700

Their Portfolio

88 Eiko Fuji Ban Ryu Honjonzo Sake 15.3% (Japan) $18.99.
87 Eiko Fuji Ban Ryu Honjonzo Sake 15.3% (Japan) $19.99.
87 Joto Junmai Sake 15% (Japan) $22.99.
94 Joto Junmai Ginjo Sake 16% (Japan) $26.99.
85 Joto Daiginjo Sake 16% (Japan) $42.99.
85 Joto Junmai Nigori Sake 15% (Japan) $22.99.
87 Joto Junmai Sake 15% (Japan) $42.99.
84 Joto Daiginjo Sake 16% (Japan) $49.99.
93 Joto Junmai Ginjo Sake 15% (Japan) $22.99.
94 Joto Junmai Nigori Sake 15% (Japan) $22.99.
86 Maboroshi Junmai Gingo Sake 15% (Japan) $33.99.
84 Maboroshi Junmai Gingo Sake 15% (Japan) $34.99.
84 Shichi Hon Junmai Sake 16% (Japan) $28.99.
85 Shichi Hon Junmai Sake 15% (Japan) $32.99.
92 Yuki No Bosha Junmai Gingo Sake 16% (Japan) $31.99.
92 Yuki No Bosha Junmai Gingo Sake 16% (Japan) $31.99.

Honjozo Sake

Wine Glass Sake.jpg
Serve in a Stemless Wine Glass
During WWII, as a result of significant rice shortages, the government allowed saké brewers to supplement their saké with an additional amount of brewer’s alcohol. While this was initially a cost control measure, the brewer’s found that the added alcohol extracted more aromatics and flavor from the saké mash. The Honjozo style makes for a somewhat lighter style of saké. Honjozo saké is much more prevalent in Japan today, while Junmai saké is more common in U.S. markets. A point of clarification: whichever style is used the overall alcohol content of the end product will be the same, typically 14-16%. Much like wine, these are the New World and Old World styles of saké. When looking at bottles of saké at your local retail store, Junmai saké will always state that on the label. When the word Junmai doesn’t appear on the label the saké it’s generally a Honjozo.

Honjozo sake has at least 30% of rice polished away with a small amount of distilled alcohol added. These are clear in appearance with flavors such as banana, toasted nuts and mushrooms and are quire subtle and elegant. Pair with tempura or fusion cuisine.